Jurgenson touches on an elemental aspect of aesthetics when he inaugurates the concept of temporary photography. “Ephemerality sharpens viewer’s focus.” He quotes Michael Sacasas who observes how social media sites produce a “memory abundance” that “devalues” the “past’s hold on the present.” Snapchat presaged the movement of (scrolling, digital) photography into a temporary realm. A response to “user’s feeling saddled with the distraction of documentary vision.” As photography was cheapened, snapchat attempted to “re-inflate” it. Finally, his vision for snapchat is revolutionary: if more people snapchat, photos permanently posted to “facebook will become correspondingly more scarce and perhaps seem more important.”

 

 

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AuthorMike Pepi

Jurgenson articulates how the social web further masks our fundamental acceptance of Internet Centrism. He terms this misconception “Digital Dualism”: the dangerous notion that online and offline are distinct spheres or that our devices instantiate a transfer between realms. He describes how there is no going back, no way to escape our fetishized conception of “offline”, “IRL”, “unplugged,” or “reality”. He was forced to correct some of the participants who fell into the linguistic trap of saying “…the internet is a place…” Like any technology—such as writing—the structure of the medium is fully imbricated with the messages transferred.

 

 

Posted
AuthorMike Pepi