Jed Perl searches for a way to preserve the “stability of painting” without defaulting into academicism. This centers on whether we find cohesion or refusal in series like Diebenkorn’s ‘Ocean Park Series’ (1967–88). Perl finds Diebenkorn’s figures a contribution to the symbolist tradition” in which “enigma of human consciousness is revealed indirectly, through a pictorial environment in which naturalistic perceptions” are “transformed by the myriad processes and pressures of the imagination.” Nicolas Linnert insists Diebenkorn “was never fixed in his focus or aesthetic position on painting… his vacillation between abstraction and representation developed its own sense of cohesion.”

 

 

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AuthorMike Pepi
Categories100 words

One of my favorite paintings by the artist George Caleb Bingham is Order No. 11, sometimes referred to by the artist as "Martial Law," and whose full title is “Civil War: as Realized in the Desolation of Border Counties of Missouri During the Operation of ‘General Order No. 11,’ Issued by Brigadier General Ewing, from his Head Quarters, Kansas City, August 25, 1863.” The New York Times today published a  fantastic retelling of the story and politics behind this painting. It is a wonderful read; the kind of context that illuminates so much of what is great about American painting from this period. 
 

“Order No. 11,” by George Caleb Bingham

“Order No. 11,” by George Caleb Bingham

Posted
AuthorMike Pepi
Categories100 words